Olympic Coyote Eye

« Back to Nature's Champion Olympic National Park, July, 2004 National Geographic Magazine

A coyote peers warily through leafy cover near Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park. Over 95% of the park's 922,000 acres is designated wilderness. Olympic is also known for its biological diversity. <br />
Isolated for eons by glacial ice, and later the waters of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca, the Olympic Peninsula has developed its own distinct array of plants and animals. Eight kinds of plants and 15 kinds of animals are found on the peninsula but no where else on Earth.
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A coyote peers warily through leafy cover near Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park. Over 95% of the park's 922,000 acres is designated wilderness. Olympic is also known for its biological diversity.
Isolated for eons by glacial ice, and later the waters of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca, the Olympic Peninsula has developed its own distinct array of plants and animals. Eight kinds of plants and 15 kinds of animals are found on the peninsula but no where else on Earth.
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