Blue-Eyed Paint at Wild Horse Sanctuary

Wild blue-eyed paint in mustang herd in northern California.<br />
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Dianne Nelson has saved mustangs on a ranch in northern California.  "It was in 1978 that the Wild Horse Sanctuary founders rounded up almost 300 wild horses for the Forest Service in Modoc County, California. Of those 300, 80 were found to be un-adoptable and were scheduled to be destroyed at a government holding facility near Tule Lake, California. <br />
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The Sanctuary is located near Shingletown, California on 5,000 acres of lush lava rock-strewn mountain meadow and forest land. Black Butte is to the west and towering Mt. Lassen is to the east. <br />
Their goals:<br />
Increase public awareness of the genetic, biological, and social value of America's wild horses through pack trips on the sanctuary, publications, mass media, and public outreach programs.<br />
Continue to develop a working, replicable model for the proper and responsible management of wild horses in their natural habitat.<br />
Demonstrate that wild horses can co-exist on the open range in ecological balance with many diverse species of wildlife, including black bear, bobcat, mountain lion, wild turkeys, badger, and gray fox.<br />
Collaborate with research projects in order to document the intricate and unique social structure, biology, reversible fertility control, and native intelligence of the wild horse.